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Translation of WordPress.org: Russian

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W3Techs.com broke the Internet down and divided it by each content management system in 2015. WordPress <a href="%1$s">far exceeded</a> number two on the list, which was Joomla at just 2.8 percent. Matt Mullenweg <a href="%2$s">wrote</a>, <em>“The big opportunity is still the 57%% of websites that don’t use any identifiable CMS yet, and that’s where I think there is still a ton of growth for us (and I’m also rooting for all the other open source CMSes).”.</em> He also <a href="%3$s">tweeted</a> just these few words, <em>“Seventy-Five to Go”.</em> You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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W3Techs.com broke the Internet down and divided it by each content management system in 2015. WordPress <a href="%1$s">far exceeded</a> number two on the list, which was Joomla at just 2.8 percent. Matt Mullenweg <a href="%2$s">wrote</a>, <em>“The big opportunity is still the 57%% of websites that don’t use any identifiable CMS yet, and that’s where I think there is still a ton of growth for us (and I’m also rooting for all the other open source CMSes).”.</em> He also <a href="%3$s">tweeted</a> just these few words, <em>“Seventy-Five to Go”.</em>

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As WordPress’ market share continued to grow, so did the amount of downloads from the plugin directory. WordPress was capable of building almost any type of website you could think of, and there were many smart people who jumped on board to build plugins, both free and premium. It was largely this rise of the WordPress entrepreneur that sent the download count over 1 billion in August, 2015. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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As WordPress’ market share continued to grow, so did the amount of downloads from the plugin directory. WordPress was capable of building almost any type of website you could think of, and there were many smart people who jumped on board to build plugins, both free and premium. It was largely this rise of the WordPress entrepreneur that sent the download count over 1 billion in August, 2015.

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v4.0 “Benny”</a> in 2014, it became possible to explore uploads in a beautiful, endless grid. A new details preview made viewing and editing any amount of media in sequence a snap. Embedding became a visual experience, showing a true preview of embedded content (such as YouTube videos) saving time and adding confidence. Writing and editing became even smoother and more immersive. The editor would now expand to fit content as you write, and the formatting tools were now available at all times. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v4.0 “Benny”</a> in 2014, it became possible to explore uploads in a beautiful, endless grid. A new details preview made viewing and editing any amount of media in sequence a snap. Embedding became a visual experience, showing a true preview of embedded content (such as YouTube videos) saving time and adding confidence. Writing and editing became even smoother and more immersive. The editor would now expand to fit content as you write, and the formatting tools were now available at all times.

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v3.9 “Smith”</a> in 2014, updates to the visual editor improved speed, accessibility, and mobile support. You could now paste into the visual editor from your word processor without wasting time to clean up messy styling. With quicker access to crop and rotation tools, it was now much easier to edit images <em>while</em> editing posts. Also, it became possible to scale images directly in the editor, and galleries began to display a beautiful grid of images right in the editor, just like in a published post. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v3.9 “Smith”</a> in 2014, updates to the visual editor improved speed, accessibility, and mobile support. You could now paste into the visual editor from your word processor without wasting time to clean up messy styling. With quicker access to crop and rotation tools, it was now much easier to edit images <em>while</em> editing posts. Also, it became possible to scale images directly in the editor, and galleries began to display a beautiful grid of images right in the editor, just like in a published post.

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The MP6 plugin merged with <a href="%s">WordPress v3.8 “Parker”</a>, released in December 2013, demonstrating that, while it may take a while to get there, harmonious design in a free software project is possible. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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The MP6 plugin merged with <a href="%s">WordPress v3.8 “Parker”</a>, released in December 2013, demonstrating that, while it may take a while to get there, harmonious design in a free software project is possible.

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In January 2013, <a href="%s">Ben Dunkle proposed new, flat icons</a>. The WordPress admin was outdated, particularly on retina displays where the icons were pixelated. Flat icons would scale properly and also allow designers to color icons using CSS. So the MP6 design project began to address icons and other improvements. Work took place in a plugin hosted by the WordPress plugin directory. Anyone could install the plugin and see the changes in their admin. Every week, the group shared a release and a report that was open to public feedback. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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In January 2013, <a href="%s">Ben Dunkle proposed new, flat icons</a>. The WordPress admin was outdated, particularly on retina displays where the icons were pixelated. Flat icons would scale properly and also allow designers to color icons using CSS. So the MP6 design project began to address icons and other improvements. Work took place in a plugin hosted by the WordPress plugin directory. Anyone could install the plugin and see the changes in their admin. Every week, the group shared a release and a report that was open to public feedback.

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WordCamp Europe, in 2013, was the first large-scale WordCamp to be held in Europe. By large-scale, we mean big. And by big, we mean awesome. This was a chance for the European WordPress community to gather together in the idyllic town of Leiden to geek-out, share experiences, do business, and most of all, talk WordPress. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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WordCamp Europe, in 2013, was the first large-scale WordCamp to be held in Europe. By large-scale, we mean big. And by big, we mean awesome. This was a chance for the European WordPress community to gather together in the idyllic town of Leiden to geek-out, share experiences, do business, and most of all, talk WordPress.

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The first en-masse, invitation-only WordPress community get-together — <a href="%s">The Community Summit</a> — took place in 2012. The Community Summit focused on issues facing WordPress software development and the wider WordPress community. Community members nominated themselves and others to receive an invitation; a team of 18 people reviewed and voted on who would be invited. The attendees — active contributors, bloggers, plugin and theme developers, and business owners from across the WordPress community — came to Tybee Island, Georgia, to talk about WordPress. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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The first en-masse, invitation-only WordPress community get-together — <a href="%s">The Community Summit</a> — took place in 2012. The Community Summit focused on issues facing WordPress software development and the wider WordPress community. Community members nominated themselves and others to receive an invitation; a team of 18 people reviewed and voted on who would be invited. The attendees — active contributors, bloggers, plugin and theme developers, and business owners from across the WordPress community — came to Tybee Island, Georgia, to talk about WordPress.

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The <a href="%s">community was pleased</a> with decoupling WordPress the project from Automattic the company. It gave people more confidence that Automattic was not out to dominate the WordPress commercial ecosystem. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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The <a href="%s">community was pleased</a> with decoupling WordPress the project from Automattic the company. It gave people more confidence that Automattic was not out to dominate the WordPress commercial ecosystem.

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The WordPress Foundation was launched in January 2010. Automattic transferred <a href="%s">the trademarks</a> later that year in September. As part of the transfer, Automattic was granted use of WordPress for WordPress.com, but not for any future domains. Matt was granted a license for WordPress.org and WordPress.net. As well as transferring the trademarks for WordPress itself, the company also transferred the WordCamp name. As with WordPress itself, this protects WordCamps as non-profit, educational events in perpetuity. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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The WordPress Foundation was launched in January 2010. Automattic transferred <a href="%s">the trademarks</a> later that year in September. As part of the transfer, Automattic was granted use of WordPress for WordPress.com, but not for any future domains. Matt was granted a license for WordPress.org and WordPress.net. As well as transferring the trademarks for WordPress itself, the company also transferred the WordCamp name. As with WordPress itself, this protects WordCamps as non-profit, educational events in perpetuity.

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.9 “Carmen”</a> in 2009, you could just paste a URL on its own line and have it magically turn it into the proper embed code, with Oembed support for YouTube, Daily Motion, Blip.tv, Flickr, Hulu, Viddler, Qik, Revision3, Scribd, Google Video, Photobucket, PollDaddy, WordPress.tv, and more would follow in future releases. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.9 “Carmen”</a> in 2009, you could just paste a URL on its own line and have it magically turn it into the proper embed code, with Oembed support for YouTube, Daily Motion, Blip.tv, Flickr, Hulu, Viddler, Qik, Revision3, Scribd, Google Video, Photobucket, PollDaddy, WordPress.tv, and more would follow in future releases.

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The change meant that users of varying skill levels needed to relearn WordPress. The growing WordPress tutorial community would need to retake every screenshot and reshoot every video. However, when WordPress users upgraded, the <a href="%s">feedback was positive</a>. Users loved the new interface. They found it intuitive and easy to use — finally demonstrating that it wasn’t change they had been unhappy with just nine months earlier — but the interface itself. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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The change meant that users of varying skill levels needed to relearn WordPress. The growing WordPress tutorial community would need to retake every screenshot and reshoot every video. However, when WordPress users upgraded, the <a href="%s">feedback was positive</a>. Users loved the new interface. They found it intuitive and easy to use — finally demonstrating that it wasn’t change they had been unhappy with just nine months earlier — but the interface itself.

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.7 “Coltrane”</a> in 2008, the admin user interface changed drastically. When screenshots of the changes appeared on community blogs, the inevitable question was “why are they changing it again?” WordPress v2.5’s design hadn’t quite settled in before another huge change came about with the implementation in v2.7. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.7 “Coltrane”</a> in 2008, the admin user interface changed drastically. When screenshots of the changes appeared on community blogs, the inevitable question was “why are they changing it again?” WordPress v2.5’s design hadn’t quite settled in before another huge change came about with the implementation in v2.7.

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With the release of <a href="%s">WordPress v2.1 “Ella”</a> in 2007, lossless XML import and export functionality made it easy to move content seamlessly between WordPress blogs. Also, it came with features like a new tabbed editor to switch between WYSIWYG and code editing mode while writing a post. Better internationalization and support for right-to-left languages. A new upload manager made it easier to manage pictures, video, and audio. It brought much cleaner code, and more. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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With the release of <a href="%s">WordPress v2.1 “Ella”</a> in 2007, lossless XML import and export functionality made it easy to move content seamlessly between WordPress blogs. Also, it came with features like a new tabbed editor to switch between WYSIWYG and code editing mode while writing a post. Better internationalization and support for right-to-left languages. A new upload manager made it easier to manage pictures, video, and audio. It brought much cleaner code, and more.

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<a href="%1$s">WordCamp 2006’s schedule</a> reflects the project’s concerns and its contributors’ passions. Mark Riley gave the first-ever workshop on getting involved with the WordPress community, now a staple talk at WordCamps. Andy Skelton presented on the widgets feature that he was working on for WordPress.com. Donncha spoke about WPMU, and Mark Jaquith explored <a href="%2$s">WordPress as a CMS</a>, <a href="%3$s">one of the most-requested sessions</a>. There were presentations about blogging and podcasting, and about journalism and monetizing. You have to log in to add a translation. Details

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<a href="%1$s">WordCamp 2006’s schedule</a> reflects the project’s concerns and its contributors’ passions. Mark Riley gave the first-ever workshop on getting involved with the WordPress community, now a staple talk at WordCamps. Andy Skelton presented on the widgets feature that he was working on for WordPress.com. Donncha spoke about WPMU, and Mark Jaquith explored <a href="%2$s">WordPress as a CMS</a>, <a href="%3$s">one of the most-requested sessions</a>. There were presentations about blogging and podcasting, and about journalism and monetizing.

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