WordPress.org

New to Translating WordPress? Read through our Translator Handbook to get started. Hide

Translation of WordPress.org: Upper Sorbian

Filter ↓ Sort ↓ All (1,036) Translated (940) Untranslated (96) Waiting (0) Fuzzy (0) Warnings (0)
1 2 3 4 5 7
Prio Original string Translation
With <a href="%s">WordPress v3.9 “Smith”</a> in 2014, updates to the visual editor improved speed, accessibility, and mobile support. You could now paste into the visual editor from your word processor without wasting time to clean up messy styling. With quicker access to crop and rotation tools, it was now much easier to edit images <em>while</em> editing posts. Also, it became possible to scale images directly in the editor, and galleries began to display a beautiful grid of images right in the editor, just like in a published post.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

With <a href="%s">WordPress v3.9 “Smith”</a> in 2014, updates to the visual editor improved speed, accessibility, and mobile support. You could now paste into the visual editor from your word processor without wasting time to clean up messy styling. With quicker access to crop and rotation tools, it was now much easier to edit images <em>while</em> editing posts. Also, it became possible to scale images directly in the editor, and galleries began to display a beautiful grid of images right in the editor, just like in a published post.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
The MP6 plugin merged with <a href="%s">WordPress v3.8 “Parker”</a>, released in December 2013, demonstrating that, while it may take a while to get there, harmonious design in a free software project is possible.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

The MP6 plugin merged with <a href="%s">WordPress v3.8 “Parker”</a>, released in December 2013, demonstrating that, while it may take a while to get there, harmonious design in a free software project is possible.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
In January 2013, <a href="%s">Ben Dunkle proposed new, flat icons</a>. The WordPress admin was outdated, particularly on retina displays where the icons were pixelated. Flat icons would scale properly and also allow designers to color icons using CSS. So the MP6 design project began to address icons and other improvements. Work took place in a plugin hosted by the WordPress plugin directory. Anyone could install the plugin and see the changes in their admin. Every week, the group shared a release and a report that was open to public feedback.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

In January 2013, <a href="%s">Ben Dunkle proposed new, flat icons</a>. The WordPress admin was outdated, particularly on retina displays where the icons were pixelated. Flat icons would scale properly and also allow designers to color icons using CSS. So the MP6 design project began to address icons and other improvements. Work took place in a plugin hosted by the WordPress plugin directory. Anyone could install the plugin and see the changes in their admin. Every week, the group shared a release and a report that was open to public feedback.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
WordCamp Europe, in 2013, was the first large-scale WordCamp to be held in Europe. By large-scale, we mean big. And by big, we mean awesome. This was a chance for the European WordPress community to gather together in the idyllic town of Leiden to geek-out, share experiences, do business, and most of all, talk WordPress.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

WordCamp Europe, in 2013, was the first large-scale WordCamp to be held in Europe. By large-scale, we mean big. And by big, we mean awesome. This was a chance for the European WordPress community to gather together in the idyllic town of Leiden to geek-out, share experiences, do business, and most of all, talk WordPress.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
The first en-masse, invitation-only WordPress community get-together — <a href="%s">The Community Summit</a> — took place in 2012. The Community Summit focused on issues facing WordPress software development and the wider WordPress community. Community members nominated themselves and others to receive an invitation; a team of 18 people reviewed and voted on who would be invited. The attendees — active contributors, bloggers, plugin and theme developers, and business owners from across the WordPress community — came to Tybee Island, Georgia, to talk about WordPress.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

The first en-masse, invitation-only WordPress community get-together — <a href="%s">The Community Summit</a> — took place in 2012. The Community Summit focused on issues facing WordPress software development and the wider WordPress community. Community members nominated themselves and others to receive an invitation; a team of 18 people reviewed and voted on who would be invited. The attendees — active contributors, bloggers, plugin and theme developers, and business owners from across the WordPress community — came to Tybee Island, Georgia, to talk about WordPress.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
The <a href="%s">community was pleased</a> with decoupling WordPress the project from Automattic the company. It gave people more confidence that Automattic was not out to dominate the WordPress commercial ecosystem.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

The <a href="%s">community was pleased</a> with decoupling WordPress the project from Automattic the company. It gave people more confidence that Automattic was not out to dominate the WordPress commercial ecosystem.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
The WordPress Foundation was launched in January 2010. Automattic transferred <a href="%s">the trademarks</a> later that year in September. As part of the transfer, Automattic was granted use of WordPress for WordPress.com, but not for any future domains. Matt was granted a license for WordPress.org and WordPress.net. As well as transferring the trademarks for WordPress itself, the company also transferred the WordCamp name. As with WordPress itself, this protects WordCamps as non-profit, educational events in perpetuity.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

The WordPress Foundation was launched in January 2010. Automattic transferred <a href="%s">the trademarks</a> later that year in September. As part of the transfer, Automattic was granted use of WordPress for WordPress.com, but not for any future domains. Matt was granted a license for WordPress.org and WordPress.net. As well as transferring the trademarks for WordPress itself, the company also transferred the WordCamp name. As with WordPress itself, this protects WordCamps as non-profit, educational events in perpetuity.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.9 “Carmen”</a> in 2009, you could just paste a URL on its own line and have it magically turn it into the proper embed code, with Oembed support for YouTube, Daily Motion, Blip.tv, Flickr, Hulu, Viddler, Qik, Revision3, Scribd, Google Video, Photobucket, PollDaddy, WordPress.tv, and more would follow in future releases.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.9 “Carmen”</a> in 2009, you could just paste a URL on its own line and have it magically turn it into the proper embed code, with Oembed support for YouTube, Daily Motion, Blip.tv, Flickr, Hulu, Viddler, Qik, Revision3, Scribd, Google Video, Photobucket, PollDaddy, WordPress.tv, and more would follow in future releases.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
The change meant that users of varying skill levels needed to relearn WordPress. The growing WordPress tutorial community would need to retake every screenshot and reshoot every video. However, when WordPress users upgraded, the <a href="%s">feedback was positive</a>. Users loved the new interface. They found it intuitive and easy to use — finally demonstrating that it wasn’t change they had been unhappy with just nine months earlier — but the interface itself.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

The change meant that users of varying skill levels needed to relearn WordPress. The growing WordPress tutorial community would need to retake every screenshot and reshoot every video. However, when WordPress users upgraded, the <a href="%s">feedback was positive</a>. Users loved the new interface. They found it intuitive and easy to use — finally demonstrating that it wasn’t change they had been unhappy with just nine months earlier — but the interface itself.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.7 “Coltrane”</a> in 2008, the admin user interface changed drastically. When screenshots of the changes appeared on community blogs, the inevitable question was “why are they changing it again?” WordPress v2.5’s design hadn’t quite settled in before another huge change came about with the implementation in v2.7.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

With <a href="%s">WordPress v2.7 “Coltrane”</a> in 2008, the admin user interface changed drastically. When screenshots of the changes appeared on community blogs, the inevitable question was “why are they changing it again?” WordPress v2.5’s design hadn’t quite settled in before another huge change came about with the implementation in v2.7.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
With the release of <a href="%s">WordPress v2.1 “Ella”</a> in 2007, lossless XML import and export functionality made it easy to move content seamlessly between WordPress blogs. Also, it came with features like a new tabbed editor to switch between WYSIWYG and code editing mode while writing a post. Better internationalization and support for right-to-left languages. A new upload manager made it easier to manage pictures, video, and audio. It brought much cleaner code, and more.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

With the release of <a href="%s">WordPress v2.1 “Ella”</a> in 2007, lossless XML import and export functionality made it easy to move content seamlessly between WordPress blogs. Also, it came with features like a new tabbed editor to switch between WYSIWYG and code editing mode while writing a post. Better internationalization and support for right-to-left languages. A new upload manager made it easier to manage pictures, video, and audio. It brought much cleaner code, and more.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
<a href="%1$s">WordCamp 2006’s schedule</a> reflects the project’s concerns and its contributors’ passions. Mark Riley gave the first-ever workshop on getting involved with the WordPress community, now a staple talk at WordCamps. Andy Skelton presented on the widgets feature that he was working on for WordPress.com. Donncha spoke about WPMU, and Mark Jaquith explored <a href="%2$s">WordPress as a CMS</a>, <a href="%3$s">one of the most-requested sessions</a>. There were presentations about blogging and podcasting, and about journalism and monetizing.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

<a href="%1$s">WordCamp 2006’s schedule</a> reflects the project’s concerns and its contributors’ passions. Mark Riley gave the first-ever workshop on getting involved with the WordPress community, now a staple talk at WordCamps. Andy Skelton presented on the widgets feature that he was working on for WordPress.com. Donncha spoke about WPMU, and Mark Jaquith explored <a href="%2$s">WordPress as a CMS</a>, <a href="%3$s">one of the most-requested sessions</a>. There were presentations about blogging and podcasting, and about journalism and monetizing.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
The event — which he announced without a venue or schedule — would be on August 5th. More than 500 people from all over the world registered: Donncha Ó Caoimh flew in from Ireland, and Mark Riley from the UK. When WordCamp did get a venue, it was the Swedish American Hall, a Market Street house that served as headquarters for the Swedish Society of San Francisco.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

The event — which he announced without a venue or schedule — would be on August 5th. More than 500 people from all over the world registered: Donncha Ó Caoimh flew in from Ireland, and Mark Riley from the UK. When WordCamp did get a venue, it was the Swedish American Hall, a Market Street house that served as headquarters for the Swedish Society of San Francisco.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
In July 2006, Matt Mullenweg announced that he would host a BarCamp-style event called <a href="%1$s">“WordCamp”</a> later that summer in San Francisco. “BarCamp-style” was a code phrase for ‘last minute,’ <a href="%1$s">he joked</a>.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

In July 2006, Matt Mullenweg announced that he would host a BarCamp-style event called <a href="%1$s">“WordCamp”</a> later that summer in San Francisco. “BarCamp-style” was a code phrase for ‘last minute,’ <a href="%1$s">he joked</a>.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
WordPress.com opened to signups in August 2005, <a href="%1$s">by invitation only</a>, to control user growth on untested servers. Many who were involved with the WordPress project got WordPress.com blogs, including <a href="%2$s">Lorelle VanFossen</a> and Mark Riley. Every new WordPress.com member also got one invite to share.
You have to log in to add a translation. Details

Original untranslated

WordPress.com opened to signups in August 2005, <a href="%1$s">by invitation only</a>, to control user growth on untested servers. Many who were involved with the WordPress project got WordPress.com blogs, including <a href="%2$s">Lorelle VanFossen</a> and Mark Riley. Every new WordPress.com member also got one invite to share.

You have to log in to edit this translation.

Meta

Status:
untranslated
Priority of the original:
normal
1 2 3 4 5 7
Legend:
Current
Waiting
Rejected
Fuzzy
Old
With warnings

Export as